From the Lighthouse
Best Books of 2018 (re-uploaded)

Best Books of 2018 (re-uploaded)

February 20, 2019

This week, Stephanie, Michelle and Jimmy finally gather to talk about their favourite books (and film!) of 2018. Jimmy talks crime movies, Michelle talks about her love of deep, depressing books, and Stephanie cheats wildly.

Adam Courtenay’s The Ship that Never Was

Adam Courtenay’s The Ship that Never Was

August 22, 2018

Part colonial history, part biography of James Porter, a convict transported to Van Diemen's Land under the rule of the tyrannical Governor Arthur, The Ship that Never War is a story of human tenacity and ingenuity in the face of unimaginably harsh conditions. Join Michelle Hamadache as she talks with Adam Courtenay about the incredible but true story of a group of convicts who stole a brand new ship from Macquarie Harbour and sailed it all the way to Chile.

For more info and some bonus materials, visit our website at: https://www.fromthelighthouse.org

Pinballs and Boiling Frogs: An interview with Australian feminist playwright Alison Lyssa

Pinballs and Boiling Frogs: An interview with Australian feminist playwright Alison Lyssa

August 8, 2018

Alison Lyssa, playwright, writer and poet, discusses her groundbreaking feminist play Pinball. Pinball, a play about a young lesbian couple fighting the patriarchy for custody of one of the women's son, was labelled 'feminist chauvinist piggery' in the Australian Press in the 80s when it was first performed. Now a set-text in universities in the UK and re-staged by Duck Duck Goose in 2014, Pinball and its playwright, Alison Lyssa, remain cutting edge in contemporary Australia. 

Lexi Freiman’s Inappropriation

Lexi Freiman’s Inappropriation

August 1, 2018

Lexi Freiman's debut novel, Inappropriation, is a hilarious biting satire on identity politics, social media, high school, cyborgs, and pretty much everything else you can imagine. This week, Stephanie chats to Lexi about her novel, writing funny books, feminism, and high school formals. 

How do you solve a problem like Junot Diaz?

How do you solve a problem like Junot Diaz?

July 4, 2018

Just as our Contemporary Literature students were reading Junot Diaz, allegations of sexual harassment against the author emerged at the Sydney Writers Festival. Stephanie talked to three students from the class - Joanna Catsanos, Juliette Kaado and Jasmine Joyan - to discuss their reactions to the revelations. 

Why Be Happy When You Can Be Normal: The Works of Jeanette Winterson

Why Be Happy When You Can Be Normal: The Works of Jeanette Winterson

April 4, 2018

Jeanette Winterson is one of the UK's most beloved and challenging writers. This week, Stephanie and Michelle discuss Winterson's long career, from the publication of Oranges are Not the Only Fruit in 1985, to her recent (fabulously titled) memoir, Why Be Happy When You Can Be Normal?Wh

The Women’s Prize for Fiction 2018 Longlist Show

The Women’s Prize for Fiction 2018 Longlist Show

March 14, 2018

The longlist for the Women's Prize was released on March 8, International Women's Day. This week, Stephanie and Michelle discuss the longlist: the books they've read, the books they want to read, and the snubs. 

For more info visit our website at: https://www.fromthelighthouse.org

The Power of Love, or Why We Read Romance Novels

The Power of Love, or Why We Read Romance Novels

November 29, 2017

Romance fiction is often unfairly maligned as silly and escapist, largely because of its association with a female readership, but in terms of popularity, nothing beats romance. This week, Stephanie and Jimmy discuss the phenomenal power of the romance novel with romance expert Associate Professor Hsu-Ming Teo. 

For more info visit our website at: https://www.fromthelighthouse.org/

Kazuo Ishiguro: An Artist of the Nobel World

Kazuo Ishiguro: An Artist of the Nobel World

October 18, 2017

Kazuo Ishiguro was recently awarded the 2017 Nobel Prize for Literature. This week, Stephanie, Michelle and Jimmy commend the Nobel Prize committee for their excellent choice. They talk Japanese cinema, floating worlds, perfect novels, and Stephanie offends Bob Dylan fans. 

Congress for Cultural Freedom or: How the CIA Fought the Cold War by Focusing on Literature

Congress for Cultural Freedom or: How the CIA Fought the Cold War by Focusing on Literature

May 24, 2017

Why was the CIA involved in literature? Stephanie and Michelle talk to Dr Alys Moody about the Congress for Cultural Freedom, a CIA-funded group that financed a whole range of literary activities in the mid-twentieth century. They ponder shadowy government organisations, cover-ups, and what happens when a bunch of writers find out that the CIA is funding their conferences.