From the Lighthouse
Mary Queen of Scots and the Enduring Appeal of Tudor Queens

Mary Queen of Scots and the Enduring Appeal of Tudor Queens

March 27, 2019

Mary Queen of Scots seems to be having a moment, with new films and plays about the Scottish queen's relationship with her cousin, Elizabeth I, recently released. This week, Michelle and Jimmy chat to Steph about one of her favourite subjects: the enduring appeal of Tudor queens. 

Pinballs and Boiling Frogs: An interview with Australian feminist playwright Alison Lyssa

Pinballs and Boiling Frogs: An interview with Australian feminist playwright Alison Lyssa

August 8, 2018

Alison Lyssa, playwright, writer and poet, discusses her groundbreaking feminist play Pinball. Pinball, a play about a young lesbian couple fighting the patriarchy for custody of one of the women's son, was labelled 'feminist chauvinist piggery' in the Australian Press in the 80s when it was first performed. Now a set-text in universities in the UK and re-staged by Duck Duck Goose in 2014, Pinball and its playwright, Alison Lyssa, remain cutting edge in contemporary Australia. 

The Life and Death of Christopher Marlowe

The Life and Death of Christopher Marlowe

May 30, 2018

Christopher Marlowe, the big Renaissance playwright before Shakespeare, was murdered on May 30, 1593. To mark the 425th anniversary of his death, Stephanie is joined by Professor Tony Cousins to talk about his life, his plays, and why he became so popular in the 1980s. 

A WoMAN of no Importance: 125 Years of Comedy, Tragedy and Confusing Aestheticism

A WoMAN of no Importance: 125 Years of Comedy, Tragedy and Confusing Aestheticism

April 18, 2018

Is Oscar Wilde's play about a woman of no importance or a man of no importance? To celebrate the 125th anniversary of the play, Stephanie and Lee discuss comedy, tragedy, and the confusing appeal of aestheticism.

Hamlet: The Indecisively Complicated Prince of Denmark

Hamlet: The Indecisively Complicated Prince of Denmark

March 28, 2018

To be or not to be? Is that the question? This week, Stephanie is joined by Professor Tony Cousins to discuss one of Shakespeare's most popular plays. Is this really a play about somebody who can't make up their mind or is it more complicated than that?